How To Pack Glasses, Dishes, and Breakables

Moving is expensive, especially when all the associated costs start hitting your budget, like junk removal, furniture and appliance disposal, and then, there is always the unexpected!

All the best movers in NJ agree, when you’re looking to cut costs, don’t cut corners by using limp boxes and newspaper to pack your possessions. Quality packing materials are essential to a successful move.

As part of Optimum Moving’s mission to deliver unmatched, white-glove moving services to the Tri-State area, we put together these hands-on best practices for packing your most fragile possessions. If you’re looking for total peace of mind, use a moving company offering full packing and unpacking services.

When you get your moving estimate, ask for packing and unpacking services to be included in the quote so you can compare the price of commercial movers doing your packing versus how much it’ll cost if you to do it yourself.

Most regular people don’t have a process for hiring complete strangers to pack and transport all their personal things—including cherished items of value. That’s why we put together the Residential Moving Checklist.

The in-depth article you’re reading now expands on one part of that checklist by providing detailed guidance for packing glassware, dishes, and other fragile items.

Glasses

Packing glasses requires a material to wrap the glassware and a container to put them in for the move.

Newspaper is a cheap way to wrap glasses. It does protect them, however, all your glasses will need to be washed after the move to remove the newsprint.

Bubble wrap offers added protection, and you may consider using bubble wrap on your more valuable and cherished pieces. It is the more expensive option for wrapping material, and frankly, in most cases it’s unnecessary.

When budgeting your move, be certain to include enough money for packing paper. You can get it at office supply stores and online. Get plenty of it!

  • Each glass needs to be wrapped in a few sheets of packing paper. Lay a stack of packing paper on a flat surface or table. Place a glass a bit off center in one corner and fold the paper over on both sides. Stuff each side into the glass and roll the glass diagonally across the paper. Repeat.
  • Glasses should be placed upside down in a well-padded container. Again, budget money for quality containers, either brand-new cardboard moving boxes or plastic containers. The containers are more costly, but after the move, they remain useful for storage. Add extra protection by including a layer of balled up sheets of packing paper to the bottom of the box and on top of your glasses before closing the box.

Avoid this pitfall! Glasses, dishes, and other heavy items (like books) should be packed in small boxes. A big, heavy box is a bad situation waiting to happen.

Pro tip: Seal the boxes thoroughly with packing tape and label them immediately. Labels should include a description of the items inside and where in the new house the box should go.

Dishes

Same rule of thumb as the glasses—you can never use too much packing paper.

If you’re moving fine china or valuable and sentimental pieces, you may consider using bubble wrap for added protection.

  • Each plate and bowl needs to be wrapped in a few sheets of packing paper. Lay a stack of packing paper on a flat surface or table. Place a plate or bowl a bit off center in one corner and fold the paper over on both sides. Roll the plate or bowl diagonally across the paper. Repeat.
  • Dishes should be placed on their side in a well-padded container. Whether you use cardboard moving boxes or plastic containers, add extra protection by including a layer of balled up sheets of packing paper to the bottom of the box and on top of your plates and bowls before closing the box.

Pro tip: If you pack multiple levels of dishes in one box, put a layer of balled up packing paper in between each level.

Breakables

For all your other fragile possessions, you need to apply the same basic packing concepts you used for glasses and dishes in creative ways. To review—always use a generous amount of packing paper and sturdy containers.

For lamps, start by separating the shade from the base, and always remove the lightbulb. Make a nest for your shade in an appropriate-sized box using balled up packing paper. The base can packed in a similar way, in a separate box, and for added protection, it can be wrapped in bubble wrap.

There are special boxes for framed pictures/paintings and mirrors. After wrapping the piece, the key is to pad the inside of the box with balled up packing paper, on the bottom, sides, and top.

Pro tip: make an “X” with masking tape across the entire face of any mirror or frame glass to mitigate danger from cracks and breaks.

Odd-shaped items

Large, fragile items with unusual shapes can be challenging to pack, especially if something has handles or legs. Remember the fundamental concepts: padding and a container. So first, use bubble wrap to protect the entire piece.

Then, use flat pieces of pliable cardboard, such as you get when you cut apart a cardboard box, and sandwich the item between two of them. Wrap plenty of packing tape around the cardboard and the item.

In the end, your possession will be protected in a capsule.

Are you moving your business, too? Move without the stress by using this Business Relocation Checklist.

Delivery Boy

Give Us a Call

If you've got questions, we've got answers.
We'd love to chat about moving you.

(855) 315-6683

Moving
From

Moving
To

Call Us: (855) 315-6683